01 9 / 2014

vivzie-pop:

theotherwesley:

Me getting up in the morning like 

Hittin’ the keyboard like

Friends comin’ online like



DID YOu SEE tHE THINGg MY GOD

reblogging cause this seems strangely accurate

01 9 / 2014

centuriespast:

Hei Tiki
Maori
Greenstone pendant. Hei tiki. Human figure with oversized head tilted to one side, arms akimbo, legs flexed, feet together. Pierced at top for suspension cord. Said to have been collected on Captain Cook’s third voyage, in 1777, by Midshipman Burr of H.M.S. “Discovery.”
Penn Museum

centuriespast:

Hei Tiki

Maori

Greenstone pendant. Hei tiki. Human figure with oversized head tilted to one side, arms akimbo, legs flexed, feet together. Pierced at top for suspension cord. Said to have been collected on Captain Cook’s third voyage, in 1777, by Midshipman Burr of H.M.S. “Discovery.”

Penn Museum

(via noiseymuse)

01 9 / 2014

spacerage:

afrikanattire:

Launched last month, Wafrica — Africa plus wa for Japan — has unveiled a range of kimono handcrafted in an array of African cotton fabrics that would seem to be a million miles from the subtle silks more commonly associated with traditional Japanese dress. Yet despite the orange comets and flashes of lightning tearing across a moss-green background, and the tribal swirls in colors that recall the sun-drenched African soil, the prints blend seamlessly into the kimono form before they surprise Japanese shoppers with their foreign origin.

The cultural cocktail is the brainchild of Serge Mouangue, a Tokyo-based concept- car designer for Nissan, who joined forces with Kururi, a Tokyo-based kimono- maker, to produce the traditional Japanese attire in 18 African prints sourced in markets from Nigeria to Senegal.

[source]

Serge Mouange introduces the WAfrica concept and kimono (Fashion show)

Le kimono Africain: Serge Mouangue TED talks

g a s p

(via noiseymuse)

01 9 / 2014

neuromaencer:

original image ‘fluorescence under ultraviolet light’ by patrick

neuromaencer:

original image ‘fluorescence under ultraviolet light’ by patrick

(via noiseymuse)

01 9 / 2014

bad-imagination:

itscarororo:

rufftoon:

vintagegal:

Night on Bald Mountain sequence in Disney’s Fantasia (1940)

I remember being mesmerized by this as a kid.

shit this still scares me!!!

love how thats the devil and he got retconned as chernabog

(via skullsandstripes)

01 9 / 2014

01 9 / 2014

valerieresin:

mylifeaskriz:

ruineshumaines:

Liz Climo on Tumblr.

this really cheered me up

These make me so happy

(via micthemicrophone)

01 9 / 2014

iguanamouth:

proto-hipsters:

iguanamouth:

a lot of people are burned out on emoticons but one that ill never get tired of is :> because it looks like youre being talked to by a friendly bird

image

I see it like

image

still a bird

(via malytwotails)

01 9 / 2014

jackieinct:

Expose: Shedding Light on Collective Beauty by Laura K Photography

Found these pictures through The Militant Baker’s website. Through each picture you can see women as they actually are and every single one of them is beautiful. 

(Source: jackievinct, via chebits)

01 9 / 2014

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

chubbymissbunny:

theerotictypewrite:

kineticpsychopathy:

totheurinationstation:

spnwholockprincessinthetardis:

mister-perplexing:

tastefullyoffensive:

Nicolas Cage as Disney Princesses by Jen Lewis

Previously: Fallen Disney Princesses

CAN YOU HANDLE THE CAGE AS OLD AS TIME

Best Disney princess by far.

Um.

The… the thing is is that I’d watch them all.

There is no God here. 

I needed this so much. Thank you.

"Beauty and THE BEEEEEES! NO! NOT THE BEEEEEEEES!”

(via synchra)

01 9 / 2014

01 9 / 2014

"Until we have seen someone’s darkness, we don’t really know who they are. Until we have forgiven someone’s darkness, we don’t really know what love is."

Marianne Williamson (via psych-facts)

(via daggerleonelli)

01 9 / 2014

beautiesofafrique:

Once a year thousands of Zulu people make the long journey to the King of the Zulu nation’s royal residence at KwaNyokeni Palace. Here, every September month, young Zulu maidens will take part in the cultural festival, the Royal Reed Dance festival - or Umkhosi woMhlanga in the Zulu language.

Steeped in the history of the rise of the Zulu kingdom the Reed Dance festival has been tirelessly celebrated by countless generations, and attracts thousands of visitors from throughout the country and from across the world.

It is a great honour for the young women to be invited to take part in the Reed Dance ceremony, and its also a source of great dignity and pride for their families and communities. According to Zulu tradition, only virgins are permitted to take part in the festival to ensure that they are ritually ‘pure’.

The Reed Dance festival is a solemn occasion for the young women, but also an opportunity to show off their singing, dancing and bead-work, the fruits of many months of excitement and preparation.

The Reed Festival takes its name from the riverbed reeds, which are the central focus of this four-day event. As the ceremony begins the young women prepare to form a procession led by the chief princess. One of the daughters of the Zulu King is also the leader of the group of maidens as they go through this important rite of passage.

The reed-sticks are carried in a procession by the young maidens who are invited to the King’s palace, with the rest of the Zulu nation helping them to celebrate their preparation for womanhood.

Each maiden carries a reed which has been cut by the riverbed and it symbolizes the power that is vested in nature. The reeds reflect a deep  connection with origin of the Zulu people, where, tradition tells us, the original ancestor emerged from a reed bed.

 And still, today an expectant hush falls on the crowd as the chief princess is the first to choose a reed. Shouts of joy and celebration greet her as the reed remains intact, and, with bated breath, each of the young women takes it in turn to choose a reed.

Accompanied by  singing and dancing, the stately procession winds its way up the hill to the palace entrance where the king awaits, flanked by his royal regiment.

As leader of the group of young women, the chief princess kneels down before the king and presents him with a reed to mark the occasion, before joining the young women in a dance of tribute to the king.

  Source

(via kudufawks)

01 9 / 2014

captainnaustralia:

captainnaustralia:

fun fact: once in biology my teacher told us that “if you’re ever crying wipe the tears all over your face and they’ll help clear up your skin” then he explained that because tears are designed to clear dust and dirt from your eyes and will do the same for your skin and clear up acne and i remember thinking “excellent, fandom will make me beautiful”

image

this isn’t how i want to be remembered 

(via studiocute)

01 9 / 2014

clorinspats:

so i was scrollin along on the internet, minding my own business when

image

okay wtf they can’t be serious

image

they’re serious

(via queenaltaria)